NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS

                                                          Email:  namiorangeny@warwick.net
                                                      Website:  namiorangeny.org
                                                  Telephone:  845-956-NAMI (6264) 
                                                  Toll-free:   1-866-906-NAMI (6264)

                                               FaceBook:   NAMI Orange County, NY
                                               FaceBook:  NAMI Orange Discussion Group

ADVOCACY


Upcoming Events/Outreaches


See details
of upcoming NAMI
meetings by clicking links below:


 
NAMI Connection
a peer-led support group for adults living with a mental illness held
every Friday

6-7:30 p.m.

no fee,
no registration


Thurs., Dec. 7
7 p.m.
NAMI Family Support Group
(Goshen)

no fee
no registration


Mon., Dec. 11
No education mtg
in December

(There will be a holiday party for members, their families & invited guests. Emails will be sent with details)


NEW

Mon., Dec. 18
7 p.m.
NAMI Family Support Group
at ORMC

Conf. Room #7

No fee,
no registration


 

Thurs., Dec. 21
7 p.m.
MHA Family & Friends Together
Support Group


 

Wed., Dec. 27
6:30 p.m.
MHA Family & Friends Plus
Social Group

Please RSVP


NAMI Basics
free 6 week course
Call Dhanu 294-2749
to register now for NAMI Basics in the Spring (since class size is limited)


NAMI
Family-to-Family

free 12 week course
Call Dhanu 294-2749
to register now for NAMI F2F in the Spring (since class size is limited)



 NAMI Presentations:

  -Ending the Silence

-In Our Own Voice

arranged by request

 

CRIMINAL/CIVIL JUSTICE SYSTEM


 

Criminal History of Unhealthy Behavior: How We Got Here

Equitas Poster Presentation at NAMI Convention 2016

 


 

  • Legal Services of the Hudson Valley
    For low-income Hudson Valley residents who need representation for non-criminal legal matters. They offer 4 specialized units of representation:
    • disability advocacy (physical or mental)
    • advocacy for children
    • advocacy for veterans and military families
    • HIV/AIDS Project

         LSHV Resource page includes Preparing for Court

     

    • Legal Aide Society
      Includes information regarding Legal Aide Society (845) 291-2454 which provides legal services for those charged with criminal offenses and for financially eligible adults in family court matters; and Pro Bono Services at (845)569-9110 which provides legal services for families and individuals threatened with eviction, for public benefits (federal and state), for families and individuals with disabilities and HIV; and for families with developmentally delayed children.
       
    • LawHelpNY relating to mental health issues and knowing your rights

    • NYS Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs
      161 Delaware Avenue
      Delmar, New York 12054
      1-518-549-0200

      Information & Referral
      : 1-800-624-4143

    • NAMI Legal FAQ


    • Law Enforcement and Mental Health (NAMI site)
      Crisis Intervention teams, strengthening officer resilience, and safeguarding officer mental health

    • Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Program (NAMI site) NEW

      A Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program is a model for community policing that brings together law enforcement, mental health providers, hospital emergency departments and individuals with mental illness and their families to improve responses to people in crisis. CIT programs enhance communication, identify mental health resources for assisting people in crisis and ensure that officers get the training and support that they need. 
      Contact information regarding CIT program in Orange County:
      Lt. Richard Carrion
      Administrative Services
      Hostage Negotiation Team
      Crisis Intervention Team
      City of Newburgh Police Department
      55 Broadway
      Newburgh,  N.Y.  12550
      (845) 569-7537 (Office)
      (845) 561-3131  (Main)
      (845) 561-9052  (Fax)
      RCarrion@cityofnewburgh-ny.gov

    • Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
      The mission of the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is to protect and advance the rights of adults and children who have mental disabilities. The Bazelon Center envisions an America where people who have mental illnesses or developmental disabilities exercise their own life choices and have access to the resources that enable them to participate fully in their communities.
    • Stepping Up
      The Stepping Up Initiative is a national effort to divert people with mental illness from jails and into treatment. The campaign brings together a powerful coalition of national organizations, including NAMI, the Council of State Governments Justice Center, the National Association of Counties, the American Psychiatric Foundation and numerous law enforcement associations, mental health organizations, and substance abuse organizations.
      The Stepping Up Initiative is a national effort to divert people with mental illness from jails and into treatment. The campaign brings together a powerful coalition of national organizations, including NAMI, the Council of State Governments Justice Center, the National Association of Counties, the American Psychiatric Foundation and numerous law enforcement associations, mental health organizations, and substance abuse organizations.  - See more at: https://www.nami.org/About-NAMI/National-Partners/The-Stepping-Up-Initiative#sthash.0nWdGHrz.dpuf

     

    The Stepping Up Initiative is a national effort to divert people with mental illness from jails and into treatment. The campaign brings together a powerful coalition of national organizations, including NAMI, the Council of State Governments Justice Center, the National Association of Counties, the American Psychiatric Foundation and numerous law enforcement associations, mental health organizations, and substance abuse organizations.  - See more at: https://www.nami.org/About-NAMI/National-Partners/The-Stepping-Up-Initiative#sthash.0nWdGHrz.dpuf

     


     

    Jailing People with Mental Illness

    quoted from NAMI website regarding Public Policy

    In a mental health crisis, people are more likely to encounter police than get medical help. As a result, 2 million people with mental illness are booked into jails each year. Nearly 15% of men and 30% of women booked into jails have a serious mental health condition.

    The vast majority of the individudals are not violent criminals—most people in jails are have not yet gone to trial, so they are not yet convicted of a crime. The rest are serving short sentences for minor crimes. 

    Once in jail, many individuals don't receive the treatment they need and end up getting worse, not better. They stay longer than their counterparts without mental illness. They are at risk of victimization and often their mental health conditions get worse.

    After leaving jail, many no longer have access to needed healthcare and benefits. A criminal record often makes it hard for individuals to get a job or housing. Many individuals, especially without access to mental health services and supports, wind up homeless, in emergency rooms and often re-arrested. At least 83% of jail inmates with a mental illness did not have access to needed treatment.

    Jailing people with mental illness creates huge burdens on law enforcement, corrections and state and local budgets. It does not protect public safety. And people who could be helped are being ignored.

    Where NAMI Stands

    Helping people get out of jail and into treatment is a top priority for us. NAMI believes that everyone should have access to a full array of mental health services and supports in their communities to help prevent interactions with police. These supports should include treatment for drug and alcohol use conditions, and supports like housing, education, supported employment and peer and family support.

    If individuals do come to the attention of law enforcement, communities should create options to divert them to treatment and services—before arrest, after arrest and at all points in the justice system. When individuals are in jail, they should have access to needed medication and support, should be signed up for health coverage if possible and should get help planning their release to ensure they get back on track.

    How NAMI Is Helping Solve the Problem

    NAMI believes that by partnering with criminal justice leaders, county and state leaders and mental health professionals we can help people with mental illness get the support and services they need to stay out of jail.

    The Stepping Up Initiative

    NAMI is a partner in The Stepping Up Initiative, an exciting national campaign to challenge counties to reduce the number of people with mental illness in jails. NAMI joins other national organizations calling on counties and communities nationwide to address this problem.

    Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) and Other Local Programs

    NAMI Affiliates around the country partner with local law enforcement on crisis intervention team (CIT) programs to help police recognize a mental health problem and get people to treatment.  We also work on a variety of jail diversion programs, re-entry programs, and provide education and support to individuals and families at risk of involvement it the justice system.

    Support to Families

    NAMI’s Helpline responds to more calls from worried families about a loved one in jail than any other issue. We provide resources and referrals to legal services. 

    In the News

    May 21, 2015
    The Huffington Post 
    It's Outrageous: Jails and Prisons Are No Place to Treat Mental Illness; Just Ask Paton Blough by Mary Giliberti

     

    How NAMI Is Helping Solve the Problem

    NAMI believes that by partnering with criminal justice leaders, county and state leaders and mental health professionals we can help people with mental illness get the support and services they need to stay out of jail.

    The Stepping Up Initiative

    NAMI is a partner in The Stepping Up Initiative, an exciting national campaign to challenge counties to reduce the number of people with mental illness in jails. NAMI joins other national organizations calling on counties and communities nationwide to address this problem.

    Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) and Other Local Programs

    NAMI Affiliates around the country partner with local law enforcement on crisis intervention team (CIT) programs to help police recognize a mental health problem and get people to treatment.  We also work on a variety of jail diversion programs, re-entry programs, and provide education and support to individuals and families at risk of involvement it the justice system.

    Support to Families

    NAMI’s Helpline responds to more calls from worried families about a loved one in jail than any other issue. We provide resources and referrals to legal services. 

    In the News

    May 21, 2015
    The Huffington Post 
    It's Outrageous: Jails and Prisons Are No Place to Treat Mental Illness; Just Ask Paton Blough by Mary Giliberti

    - See more at: http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Public-Policy/Jailing-People-with-Mental-Illness#sthash.4JK22sLD.dpuf

    How NAMI Is Helping Solve the Problem

    NAMI believes that by partnering with criminal justice leaders, county and state leaders and mental health professionals we can help people with mental illness get the support and services they need to stay out of jail.

    The Stepping Up Initiative

    NAMI is a partner in The Stepping Up Initiative, an exciting national campaign to challenge counties to reduce the number of people with mental illness in jails. NAMI joins other national organizations calling on counties and communities nationwide to address this problem.

    Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) and Other Local Programs

    NAMI Affiliates around the country partner with local law enforcement on crisis intervention team (CIT) programs to help police recognize a mental health problem and get people to treatment.  We also work on a variety of jail diversion programs, re-entry programs, and provide education and support to individuals and families at risk of involvement it the justice system.

    Support to Families

    NAMI’s Helpline responds to more calls from worried families about a loved one in jail than any other issue. We provide resources and referrals to legal services. 

    In the News

    May 21, 2015
    The Huffington Post 
    It's Outrageous: Jails and Prisons Are No Place to Treat Mental Illness; Just Ask Paton Blough by Mary Giliberti

    - See more at: http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Public-Policy/Jailing-People-with-Mental-Illness#sthash.4JK22sLD.dpuf

    How NAMI Is Helping Solve the Problem

    NAMI believes that by partnering with criminal justice leaders, county and state leaders and mental health professionals we can help people with mental illness get the support and services they need to stay out of jail.

    The Stepping Up Initiative

    NAMI is a partner in The Stepping Up Initiative, an exciting national campaign to challenge counties to reduce the number of people with mental illness in jails. NAMI joins other national organizations calling on counties and communities nationwide to address this problem.

    Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) and Other Local Programs

    NAMI Affiliates around the country partner with local law enforcement on crisis intervention team (CIT) programs to help police recognize a mental health problem and get people to treatment.  We also work on a variety of jail diversion programs, re-entry programs, and provide education and support to individuals and families at risk of involvement it the justice system.

    Support to Families

    NAMI’s Helpline responds to more calls from worried families about a loved one in jail than any other issue. We provide resources and referrals to legal services. 

    In the News

    May 21, 2015
    The Huffington Post 
    It's Outrageous: Jails and Prisons Are No Place to Treat Mental Illness; Just Ask Paton Blough by Mary Giliberti

    - See more at: http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Public-Policy/Jailing-People-with-Mental-Illness#sthash.4JK22sLD.dpuf

      How NAMI Is Helping Solve the Problem

      NAMI believes that by partnering with criminal justice leaders, county and state leaders and mental health professionals we can help people with mental illness get the support and services they need to stay out of jail.

      The Stepping Up Initiative

      NAMI is a partner in The Stepping Up Initiative, an exciting national campaign to challenge counties to reduce the number of people with mental illness in jails. NAMI joins other national organizations calling on counties and communities nationwide to address this problem.

      Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) and Other Local Programs

      NAMI Affiliates around the country partner with local law enforcement on crisis intervention team (CIT) programs to help police recognize a mental health problem and get people to treatment.  We also work on a variety of jail diversion programs, re-entry programs, and provide education and support to individuals and families at risk of involvement it the justice system.

      Support to Families

      NAMI’s Helpline responds to more calls from worried families about a loved one in jail than any other issue. We provide resources and referrals to legal services. 

      In the News

      May 21, 2015
      The Huffington Post 
      It's Outrageous: Jails and Prisons Are No Place to Treat Mental Illness; Just Ask Paton Blough by Mary Giliberti

      - See more at: http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Public-Policy/Jailing-People-with-Mental-Illness#sthash.4JK22sLD.dpuf

      Mental Health Courts

      New York State’s mental health courts seek to improve public safety, court operations, and the well-being of people with mental illness by linking to court-supervised, community-based treatment defendants whose mental illness is related to their current criminal justice involvement and whose participation in the Mental Health Court will not create an increased risk to public safety.

      Locations

       

      Mission and Goals

      New York State’s mental health courts seek to improve public safety, court operations, and the well-being of people with mental illness by linking to court-supervised, community-based treatment defendants whose mental illness is related to their current criminal justice involvement and whose participation in the Mental Health Court will not create an increased risk to public safety.

      The impetus behind each Mental Health Court reflects local needs and priorities. Some Mental Health Courts originated where Drug Courts were faced with challenges presented by drug court participants with co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse disorders. Others were designed to help alleviate overcrowding in the local jail. Virtually all Mental Health Courts, however, have identified some combination of the following goals:

      Improve public safety: Many people with mental illness cycle repeatedly through the criminal justice system. Linking these offenders to community-based services is intended to reduce recidivism.

      Reduce length of time in jail or prison for offenders with mental illness: Mental Health Courts seek to reduce both the frequency of arrests and the duration of incarceration of offenders with mental illness for whom community-based treatment is an appropriate alternative to incarceration.

      Use overtaxed criminal justice resources more efficiently: Mental Health Courts are a means of reducing the frequency of contacts between law enforcement and people with mental illness, improving court operations in cases involving defendants with mental illness, and minimizing the strains on correctional facilities caused by incarcerating people with mental illness.

      Improve courts' ability to identify, assess and monitor offenders with mental illness: By equipping courts with the tools necessary to perform meaningful assessments, identify appropriate treatment options and make connections to the mental health system, mental health courts provide judges with the means to make more informed decisions about cases involving offenders with mental illness.

      Improve quality of life for people with mental illness: Mental Health Courts seek to reverse the trend in recent decades toward “criminalization” of mental illness, a term that describes society’s use of the criminal justice system to respond to behaviors associated with or caused by mental illness. Instead of incarcerating mentally ill offenders, Mental Health Courts can help to connect them to community-based treatment and support services that encourage recovery.

      Improve coordination between the mental health and criminal justice systems: In bringing together criminal justice and mental health stakeholders and involving many parties in the planning and implementation process, Mental Health Courts are catalysts for cross-training and systems improvement programs.

      Mental Health Connection at Middletown City Court - view page 12

      VeteransTrack at the City of Middletown Court - view page 12

       

       


       

      Historic Settlement Overhauls
      Solitary Confinement in New York

      On December 16, 2015 the New York Civil Liberties Union and New York State announced a settlement agreement that will comprehensively overhaul solitary confinement in New York State -- one of the largest prison systems in the country -- and provide a framework for ending the state's overreliance on extreme isolation. The agreement will result in the end of traditional solitary confinement for more than 1,100 people. NAMI-NYS has been dedicated to demonstrating the negative mental health impact of solitary confinement and we have constantly advocated to reform the practice.